Editorial committee

Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education Editorial Committee


Janet R. Barrett

Janet R. Barrett
Marilyn Pflederer Zimmerman Scholar in Music Education
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Professor, Music Education
Editor, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education

Janet Revell Barrett is the Marilyn Pflederer Zimmerman Endowed Scholar in Music Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research interests include the reconceptualization of the music curriculum, secondary general music, interdisciplinary approaches in music, and music teacher education. Barrett has published widely in music education and is an author or editor of five books: Sound Ways of Knowing: Music in the Interdisciplinary Curriculum; Looking In On Music Teaching; Constructing a Personal Orientation to Music Teaching; Music Education at a Crossroads; and The Musical Experience: Rethinking Music Teaching and Learning. She has also served on the faculty of Northwestern University and the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. Prior to her work in higher education, Barrett taught general and choral music in Iowa and Wisconsin. She is immediate past chair of the Society for Music Teacher Education and editor of the Bulletin for the Council of Research in Music Education.


Joseph Abramo

Joseph Abramo
University of Connecticut

Joseph Abramo, Ed. D. is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Music Education in the Neag School of Education at the University of Connecticut, where he teaches undergraduate courses in instrumental methods and graduate courses in the theoretical foundations of music education and popular music and informal learning, and supervises student teachers. His areas of research include popular music, music teacher education, gender, cultural studies, race and multiculturalism, disability studies, poststructuralism, and constructivism. His articles include publications in Music Educators Journal, The Journal of Research in Music Education, The Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Music Education Research, The Philosophy of Music Education Review, Research Studies in Music Education, The Journal of Music Teacher EducationMusic Education Research International, and Visions of Research in Music Education. He has also presented at various international, national, and regional conferences. Dr. Abramo serves on the advisory committee of Music Educators Journal and is the Chair of the Philosophy Special Research Interest Group of the National Association for Music Education. He served as an early reviewer for the new national standards in music. He also served as a co-chair of Gender Research in Music Education (GRIME) and a co-editor of its on-line, peer-reviewed journal Gender, Education, Music, Society. Dr. Abramo received The Outstanding Emerging Researcher Award from the Center for Music Education Research at the University of South Florida. He holds degrees from Teachers College of Columbia University, Michigan State University, and the Crane School of Music at SUNY Potsdam. He previously served as an Assistant Professor of Music Education at Hartwick College in Oneonta, New York.


Randall Everett Allsup

Randall Everett Allsup
Assistant Professor of Music Education
Teachers College Columbia University, New York, New York
http://www.reallsup.com/

Randall Everett Allsup holds degrees in music performance and music education from Northwestern and Columbia University. Randall graduated from Teachers College in 2002 and received the Outstanding Dissertation of the Year Award by the Council for Research in Music Education for Crossing Over: Mutual Learning and Democratic Action in Instrumental Music Education. Before returning to Teachers College as assistant professor, Randall was coordinator of music education and director of bands at Hartwick College, Oneonta, NY. He has taught courses in music education and conducting at the Chinese Culture University, Taiwan, and in 2009, he was awarded a Fulbright grant to teach and conduct research at the Sibelius Academy, Helsinki, Finland. Randall currently teaches courses in creativity and problem solving; democracy and music education; philosophies of music education; and doctoral seminar. He is the proud recipient of the Outstanding Teaching Award at Columbia.

Randall’s interests in issues surrounding social justice and democracy were sharpened by coursework with Maxine Greene and his work in schools in neglected neighborhoods of New York City, teaching music at Cardinal Hayes High School in the South Bronx and through the Our Children’s Foundation in west Harlem. In 2006, Randall hosted and organized the first-ever “International Conference on Music Education, Equity, and Social Justice” at Teachers College. Today, he remains a passionate advocate of the transformative affects of public schooling and arts education.

Randall writes about the challenges of reconceptualizing music pedagogy, with a special interest instrumental and popular music.His teaching and scholarship is shaped by great thinkers like Maxine Greene, Paulo Freire, and John Dewey. His articles appear in Philosophy of Music Education Review; Theory into Practice; Music Education Research; Music Educators Journal; Bluegrass Music News; School Music News; Visions of Research in Music Education; Teaching Music; Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education; Nordic Research in Music Education; Finnish Journal of Music Education; British Journal of Music Education;and Journal of Research in Music Education. He serves on the editorial boards of Music Education Research, Finnish Journal of Music Education, and the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education.


Mark R. Campbell

Mark R. Campbell
Associate Professor of Music Education
Crane School of Music, SUNY, Potsdam, New York

Mark Robin Campbell, Associate Professor of Music Education at the Crane School of Music, State University of New York at Potsdam, teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in music education. His public school teaching includes over 25 years of experience in general music, band, chorus and orchestra in Illinois and New York. Campbell is author/editor of numerous articles and books including: Constructing a Personal Orientation to Music Teaching (Routlege) and On Musicality and Milestone: Selected Writings of Marilyn Pflederer Zimmerman with Contributions from the Profession (University of Illinois). His articles can be found in the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Journal of Research in Music Education, Music Educators Journal, Journal of Aesthetic Education, and others. He is currently a Co-Editor of Advances in Music Education Research (Information Age Publishing), a book series project of the Music Education Special Interest Group of AERA. Campbell holds Master’s and doctoral degrees in music education from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.


Kenneth Elpus

Kenneth Elpus
Assistant Professor of Music Education
University of Maryland, College Park

Kenneth Elpus is Assistant Professor of Music Education at the University of Maryland, College Park, where he teaches undergraduate classes in choral music education, graduate courses in music education research, and conducts the University Women’s Chorus. He holds the Bachelor of Music degree in choral music education from The College of New Jersey and earned the master of music and doctor of philosophy degrees in music education at Northwestern University in Evanston, IL. Ken’s research examines issues of demographics and selection into music study, music education in education policy, and music education as a context for positive youth development. This work is published in the Journal of Research in Music Education, Arts Education Policy Review, and the Music Educators Journal, among other venues. His research agenda at the University of Maryland is funded in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts.


Juliet Hess

Juliet Hess
Michigan State University

Juliet Hess is an assistant professor of music education at Michigan State University, where she teaches secondary general methods in music education, principles in music education, and philosophy and sociology of music education. Juliet received her Ph. D. in Sociology of Education from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto. She previously taught elementary and middle school vocal, instrumental, and “world” music at a public school in the Greater Toronto Area. Her research interests include anti-oppression education, activism in music and music education, music education for social justice, and the question of ethics in world music study.


Maud Hickey

Maud Hickey
Northwestern University

Maud Hickey is Associate Professor and coordinator of Music Education in the Bienen School of Music at Northwestern University. Hickey’s research interest lies in the teaching of, as well as assessment of, musical creativity as manifest through improvisation and composition. She is a five-year recipient of a $50,000 grant from the Chicago Community Trust to work with juveniles in the Cook County Juvenile Detention Center on music composition projects. Her book Music Outside the Lines: Ideas for Composing Music in K-12 Classrooms was recently published by Oxford University Press (2012). She is the author of chapters in several books and articles in journals such as in Music Educators Journal, General Music TodayJournal of Research in Music Education, and Research Studies in Music Education. Hickey has been invited to present her work at several state, regional, national and international conferences. She currently serves as a member of the Society for Research in Music Education Executive Committee, and on the professional development committee of the College Music Society. In 2012, she was appointed a member of the inaugural cohort of Faculty Fellows for Northwestern’s Center for Civic Engagement. Previous to work at the University level, Dr. Hickey was a public school band director.


Roger Mantie

Roger Mantie
Arizona State University

Roger’s Mantie’s (PhD, University of Toronto; MM, Brandon University) teaching and scholarship are informed by his fourteen years as a school music educator. Prior to his appointment at Arizona State University, Roger was an assistant professor at Boston University’s College of Fine Arts. His work emphasizes connections between schooling and society, with an focus on lifelong engagement in and with music. Former Chair of the Philosophy Special Research Interest Group of NAfME and current Secretary of the International Society for the Philosophy of Music Education and Website Manager for the MayDay Group, Roger is on the editorial boards of Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education, the International Journal of Community Music, and the Canadian Music Educator, andis a co-editor for the [Oxford] Handbook of Technology and Music Education (forthcoming) and the [Oxford] Handbook of Music Making and Leisure (forthcoming).


Koji Matsunobu

Koji Matsunobu
The Education University of Hong Kong

Koji Matsunobu is a musician, educator, and ethnographer. After completing a Ph.D. in music education, he became Fulbright Graduate Scholar and earned another Ph.D. in secondary and continuing education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Prior to joining the Education University of Hong Kong he held academic positions at the University of Queensland, Australia and the University of Kumamoto, Japan. He has written widely on spirituality, creativity, mindfulness, silence, arts integration, world music pedagogy, place-based education, and qualitative research. His articles appear in Ageing and SocietyBritish Journal of Music EducationHarvard Educational ReviewInternational Journal of Music EducationInternational Review of Qualitative ResearchJournal of Aesthetic EducationJournal of Research in Music EducationMusic Education Research; and many handbooks and edited books. He teaches psychology and sociology of music education, primary and secondary music, world music, mindfulness, interdisciplinary arts, and research methodology courses. He is currently a member of the Board of Directors of the International Society for Music Education. He also serves on the advisory boards of the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, the Korean Association of Qualitative Inquiry, and the International Journal of Music Education.


Pete Miksza

Pete Miksza
Associate Professor of Music Education
Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, Bloomington, Indiana

His teaching duties include undergraduate and graduate courses with emphases on instrumental music teacher preparation, psychological dimensions of music teaching and learning, and research methods. He also works with graduate students to develop and carry out original research projects as theses and dissertations.

Prior to his appointment at IU, Miksza served as band director at Pequannock Valley Middle School, assistant marching band director at Pequannock Township High School in New Jersey, and assistant professor of music education at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

His primary research interests lie in the investigation of music practicing and music teacher preparation. He has presented papers at regional, national, and international research conferences and has articles and book chapters published in several prominent peer-reviewed publications, such as the Journal of Research in Music Education, the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music EducationPsychology of Music, Contributions to Music Education, Music Education Research International, and the Journal of Music Teacher Education.

Miksza serves on the Advisory Committee of the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, is an active participant in the Society for Music Teacher Education, and serves as a reviewer for the American Educational Research Association Music Education Special Interest Group. He is also a recipient of the Outstanding Emerging Researcher Award issued by the Center for Music Education Research at the University of South Florida.

Miksza founded and directed the University of Colorado Middle School Wind and String Ensemble, a middle school band and string outreach program, and co-founded the university’s innovative music teacher recruitment program, Trying on Teaching. In addition, he served as faculty advisor for the Collegiate National Association for Music Education Chapter at the school.


Mark Montemayor

Mark Montemayor
University of Northern Colorado

Mark Montemayor is Professor of Music and head of the music education area here at the University of Northern Colorado, where he has served since 2005. His teaching responsibilities have included undergraduate instrumental methods courses, graduate courses in research and curriculum, and student teacher supervision and mentoring. He has presented research on topics related to the cognitive psychology of music teaching and learning—specifically, on matters such as teacher perception, teacher education, and ensemble conducting—at numerous state, regional, and national, and international conferences, including those for the National Association for Music Education and the Society for Music Perception and Cognition. He has also presented at the Cultural Diversity in Music Education conference and at the Asia-Pacific Symposium on Music Education Research. Dr. Montemayor’s work is published in several articles in the Journal of Research in Music Education (where he serves on the editorial board), and the International Journal of Music Education (for which he has served as a guest reviewer), and in the book series A Composer’s Insight: Thoughts, Analysis and Commentary on Contemporary Masterpieces for Wind Band. He also serves as Research Chair for the Colorado Music Educators Association and as Colorado State Chair for the Society for Music Teacher Education. His forthcoming book (with William J. Coppola and Christopher Mena), The Routledge World Music Pedagogy Series, Volume IV: Instrumental Music Education, will be published in 2018. He was recently recognized as Scholar of the Year for the UNC College of Performing and Visual Arts.

Dr. Montemayor taught music for seven years at Gig Harbor High School in Gig Harbor, Washington, where the bands under his direction earned wide acclaim. He has served as a guest conductor for the UNC Concert Band and for the UNC Chamber Choir during its tour to Rome and Vatican City, and he recently conducted the Advanced Honor Band for the Denver Public Schools Citywide Band Festival. He holds a Bachelor of Music degree from the University of Texas at Austin, where he studied saxophone performance and music education, and he earned his Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees from the University of Washington.


David E. Myers

David E. Myers
Director of the School of Music
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota

David Myers, Professor and Director of the School of Music, is an internationally regarded music educator and proponent of innovation in higher music education. Prior to coming to the University of Minnesota in 2008, he founded the Center for Educational Partnerships and its groundbreaking Sound Learning partnership among Georgia State University, the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, community musicians, and inner-city schools. A former public school teacher and accomplished organist, he has been the American consultant for a joint Master of Music degree for New Audiences and Innovative Practice among five European conservatories. He has served as panel chair and panelist for the National Endowment for the Arts and keynoted numerous meetings, including the League of American Orchestras national convention, the International Research in Music Education Conference at the University of Exeter (UK), and the national meeting of the College Music Society. He has published, presented, and consulted widely, including work with the National Association of Schools of Music, the National Guild of Community Schools of the Arts, Opera America, the Music Educators National Conference, the College Music Society, and the International Society for Music Education. He has served as author and editor for sections on lifelong learning and school-community partnerships in two major music education handbooks. He currently serves on the editorial committees of the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education and the International Journal of Community Music. His 1996 research for NEA, Beyond Tradition: Partnerships Among Orchestras, Schools, and Communities, remains a seminal publication in the field. Dr. Myers’s work has been recognized by the Atlanta Partners in Education and in Harvard Project Zero’s study, Qualities of Quality. He received both the junior and senior outstanding faculty awards from the College of Arts and Sciences at Georgia State University, as well as the 2008 Distinguished Career Award from the Georgia Music Educators Association. In 2010, his biography was included in the New Groves Dictionary of American Music, 2nd edition. As an evaluator, he has conducted research for the League of American Orchestras on the Orchestra Leadership Academy, the Institutional Vision Program, the Ford Made in America program, and the American Conducting Fellows Program. In addition to NEA, his work has been funded by the Texaco Foundation, the Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary Education, and the Cousins Foundation. Currently, he serves as a Governing Board member of the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra. Dr. Myers has been a professor of curriculum and instruction at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and in 1993 was a visiting professor in the Sydney (AUS) Conservatorium of Music, University of Sydney. He holds degrees from Lebanon Valley College, the Eastman School of Music, and The University of Michigan.


Alison M. Reynolds

Alison M. Reynolds
Associate Professor of Music Education
Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Dr. Reynolds teaches undergraduates courses and guides field experiences in general music; collaborates with undergraduate Diamond Research Scholars, Diamond Peer Teachers, and recipients of Creative Arts grants; teaches graduate courses in music research, learning theory, and practice; and guides pre-dissertation and dissertation research.

Dr. Reynolds is co-author of Jump Right In: The Music Curriculum (Revised Edition), and Music Play: Guide for Parents, Teachers, and Caregivers (translations into the Korean, Lithuanian, and Chinese), both published by GIA in Chicago. She is on the editorial review boards for the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education and He Kupu (the word). Her research is published in the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Journal of Research in Music Education, Research in Music Education, Journal of Historical Research in Music Education, and Journal of Music Teacher Education. She is author or co-author for articles in Perspectives; several state music educator journals; and book chapters on topics such as parents’ documentation of their children’s music behaviors, parallels between language development and music development, early childhood curriculum, movement, professional development for music teachers, and mentoring undergraduate teaching assistants who are “trying on” teaching in higher education. She has presented research and practice sessions at venues such as International Society for Music Education and the Early Childhood Music Education Commission, National Association for Music Education (NAfME), International Conference on Narrative Inquiry in Music Education, New Directions Conference, International Service-Learning Research Conference, International Conference on Civic Education Research, and NAfME All-Eastern Division Conference, and state music educators conferences.

Dr. Reynolds is Chair of the Early Childhood Music Special Research Interest Group (NAfME) and Chair of Research for Pennsylvania Music Educators Association.


Lauren Kapalka Richerme

Lauren Kapalka Richerme
Indiana University

Lauren Kapalka Richerme is assistant professor of music education at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, where she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on music education foundations, philosophy, and sociology. Her research interests include poststructuralist philosophy, education policy, and secondary general music. Lauren’s work has been published in the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education,Journal of Research in Music Education, Philosophy of Music Education ReviewInternational Journal of Music Education, Music Education Research, Arts Education Policy ReviewJournal of Music Teacher EducationMusic Educators Journal, and Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education. At present, she serves on the editorial board of Arts Education Policy Review, as co-facilitator for the Society for Music Teacher Education Policy ASPA, and as chair for the Philosophy Special Research Interest Group. Prior to her university teaching, Lauren taught high school and middle school band and general music in Massachusetts. She holds degrees from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Harvard University, and Arizona State University.


David A. Rickels

David A. Rickels
Associate Professor and Chair of Music Education at the University of Colorado Boulder

David A. Rickels, Associate Professor and Chair of Music Education at the University of Colorado Boulder, was appointed to the faculty of the College of Music in 2012. He teaches music education classes that include introductory courses for future teachers, instrumental music methods, psychology, and research methods. Dr. Rickels previously taught in a wide range of settings from kindergarten through college, including high school concert and marching bands, elementary beginning band and general music, and methods courses for music educators. Prior to his appointment at the University of Colorado, Dr. Rickels taught at Boise State University (Idaho) and Mesa Community College (Arizona). The majority of his public school teaching was spent in the Mesa Public Schools (Arizona), including serving as the Director of Bands at Westwood High School, where his students achieved Superior (I) ratings in the areas of marching band, concert band, and chamber ensemble performance.

Dr. Rickels maintains an active professional involvement with the National Association for Music Education (NAfME) and its state affiliates. He currently serves on the national board of the Society for Music Teacher Education (SMTE), where he was elected as Chair of SMTE for 2020-2022 after having served as the Communications Chair and the Northwest Division Representative. Dr. Rickels has also served music educator associations in state and local roles that have included festival chair, adjudicator, technology chair, and NAfME Collegiate chair. He is a regular presenter of workshops, professional development seminars, and educational clinics throughout the United States. In addition to multiple guest conducting appearances, Dr. Rickels also has an extensive and varied background in the marching arts as a performer, instructor, drill designer, clinician, and adjudicator.

As a researcher, Dr. Rickels’ interests have centered on music teacher recruitment, technology in learning, and competition in music. He has presented his research findings at national and international conferences of organizations such as the National Association for Music Education (NAfME), the International Society for Music Education (ISME), and the Society for Music Teacher Education (SMTE). His research has appeared in peer-reviewed journals including the Journal of Research in Music Education, the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, the Journal of Music Teacher Education, and the Journal of Band Research. Dr. Rickels has served on the editorial committee of the Music Educators Journal and is a current member of the editorial board for the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, in addition to having served as a guest reviewer for the Journal of Research in Music Education and for Oxford University Press.

Dr. Rickels holds degrees including Doctor of Musical Arts in Music Education from Arizona State University.


Kathryn Roulston

Kathryn Roulston
Professor
Qualitative Research Program
Department of Lifelong Education, Administration, and Policy
University of Georgia

Kathryn Roulston is Professor in the Qualitative Research Program in the Department of Lifelong Education, Administration, and Policy in the College of Education at the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia, where she teaches qualitative research methods. She has a Bachelor of Music Education from the Queensland Conservatorium of Music, a Masters of Music (School Music with Kodály emphasis) from the University of Calgary, Canada, and a PhD in Education from the University of Queensland. Prior to moving to the United States, she taught classroom music in elementary schools (P-8) in Queensland, Australia, and was adjunct instructor in pre-service teacher education programs at the University of Southern Queensland and Queensland University of Technology. In addition to continuing to research topics in music education in collaboration with colleagues in the Hugh Hodgson School of Music at UGA, her research interests include qualitative research methods, qualitative interviewing, and analyses of talk-in-interaction. She is author of Reflective interviewing: A guide to theory and practice (Sage, 2010), and has contributed chapters to The SAGE handbook of interview researchThe complexity of the craft (2012, 2nd ed.), as well as forthcoming volumes, The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Data Analysis and the Oxford Handbook of Qualitative Research in American Music Education. She has also published articles in a variety of journals, including Music Education Research, the International Journal of Music Education, Research Studies in Music Education, International Journal of Education and the Arts, Qualitative Research, Qualitative InquiryInternational Journal of Research and Method in Education, International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Reflective Practice, Oxford Review of Education, Educational Action Research and Applied Linguistics.


Patrick Schmidt

Patrick Schmidt
Columbia University

Patrick Schmidt is joining the faculty of Teachers College, Columbia University as Professor of music and music education, in Fall 2022. Previously he served as faculty and chair of Music Education and Dance at Western University, Canada, as well as Associate Director of Florida International University’s School of Music in Miami, Florida and at the Westminster College in Princeton, USA, for 11 years. He also currently serves as a docent at the Sibelius Academy, University of the Arts, Helsinki. A Latino from Brazil, Schmidt’s innovative work in critical pedagogy, urban music education and policy studies is recognized nationally and internationally. His most recent publications can be found in the International Journal of Music Education; Theory into Practice; Arts Education Policy Review; Research in Music Education, Journal of Curriculum Theorizing; Philosophy of Music Education Review; Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education; ABEM Journal in Brazil; and the Finnish Journal of Music Education. Schmidt serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of the Council of Research in Music Education, Arts Education Policy Review, the ABEM Journal, the Revista Internacional de Educacíon Musical published by ISME, and the Journal of Popular Music Education.  Beyond his ongoing research projects, Schmidt has led several consulting and evaluative projects including recent work for the National YoungArts Foundation, and the New World Symphony in the United States, as well as for the Ministry of Culture and Education in Chile. Schmidt co-edited the Oxford Handbook of Music Education and Social Justice released in 2015, a two-volume book on Leadership in Higher Music Education (2020) and the 2021 Routledge Handbook for the Sociology of Music Education. Patrick’s co-edited book with Richard Colwell Policy and the Political Life of Music Education was released by Oxford University Press in February 2017. His latest book, Policy as Practice: A guide for Music Educators was released by Oxford in 2020.

Short Version

Patrick Schmidt is joining the faculty of Teachers College, Columbia University as Professor of music and music education, in Fall 2022, after seven years as faculty and chair of music education and Dance at Western University, Canada. Recent publications can be found in various journals focused on education, music and policy. Schmidt led consulting and evaluative projects for the National YoungArts Foundation and the New World Symphony. He co-edited the Oxford Handbook of Music Education and Social Justice (2015), a two-volume book on Leadership in Higher Music Education (2020) and the 2021 Routledge Handbook for the Sociology of Music Education. His books Policy and the Political Life of Music Education and Policy as Practice: A guide for Music Educators were released by Oxford in 2017 and 2020.


Bridget Sweet

Bridget Sweet

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Professor, Music Education
Associate Professor of Music Education

Bridget Sweet is Associate Professor of Music Education at University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, Illinois. After completing her Bachelors Degree in Music Education at Western Michigan University, Dr. Sweet enjoyed a successful tenure as a middle school choir teacher for nearly ten years. Her interests in adolescent music education intensified during her Masters and Doctoral programs in Music Education at Michigan State University, which contributed to her research focused on characteristics of effective and exemplary music teachers. Prior to her work at the University of Illinois, Dr. Sweet was Assistant Professor of Music Education at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, PA. At the University of Illinois, Dr. Sweet teaches music education pedagogy, including choral methods and literature, middle-level general music methods, graduate courses in music education, as well as a course focused on the development of healthy practices for all musicians.

Dr. Sweet continues to work extensively with adolescent singers as a teacher, clinician, conductor, and adjudicator. She wrote the books Growing Musicians: Teaching Music in Middle School and Beyond (2016, Oxford University Press) and Thinking Outside the Voice Box: Adolescent Voice Change in Music Education (2019, Oxford University Press). Dr. Sweet’s research interests include middle level choral music education, female and male adolescent voice change, empowering music educators, health and wellness, and intersections of diversity and the music classroom. Her research has appeared in publications of Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Choral Journal, International Journal of Music Education: Research,Journal of Research in Music Educationand Update: Applications of Research in Music Education. She was invited to author the chapter “Qualitative Choral Music Research” in The Oxford Handbook of Qualitative Research in American Music Education (2014). Dr. Sweet is a member of the Editorial Committee of the Bulletin of the Council of Research in Music Education, International Journal of Research in Choral Music, Journal of Research in Music Education, and Qualitative Research in Music Education.


Brent C. Talbot

Brent C. Talbot
Gettysburg College

Brent C. Talbot has been a leading voice for change in the field of music education. A prolific author and frequent presenter, Talbot examines power, discourse, and issues of justice in varied settings for music learning around the globe. He is the editor of one of the bestselling books in music education, Marginalized Voices in Music Education (Routledge), the curator of an indigenous-centering resource, Gending Rare: Children’s Songs and Games from Bali (GIA), and co-author of the acclaimed book Education, Music, and the Lives of Undergraduates: Collegiate A Cappella and the Pursuit of Happiness (Bloomsbury).

Over the past decade Talbot has published over 30 articles and chapters with leading journals and publishing companies and has delivered over 140 presentations on topics that promote equity and inclusion and diversify approaches in music learning and teaching. He serves on the steering committees of leading national and international organizations in music education and on multiple research and editorial boards throughout the globe.

Prior to his appointment as Professor and Head of Music at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Talbot served twelve years as Coordinator of Music Education at the Sunderman Conservatory of Music at Gettysburg College. During this period, he also served as Artistic Director of the Gettysburg Children’s Choir, a 3rd through 12th grade justice-oriented choir serving the populations of South-Central Pennsylvania, and was Founding Director of Gamelan Gita Semara, an Indonesian instrumental ensemble that was frequently invited to perform at universities and music festivals around the world, including the acclaimed Bali Arts Festival in 2016.

A former middle and high school teacher, Talbot taught choir, band, and general music classes in the Rochester (NY) City School District and at Poly Prep Country Day School in Brooklyn, where he served as chair of the music department.

For more information about Talbot and the work he does at the intersections of music education and ethnomusicology visit his website: www.brentctalbot.com.


David Teachout

David Teachout
University of North Carolina at Greensboro

David J. Teachout is Professor and Head of the Music Education Department at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) and serves as Institutional Representative for UNCG to the National Association of Schools of Music. His degrees are from West Virginia University (BME), the University of Oklahoma (MME), and Kent State University (PhD). Prior to joining the faculty at UNCG in 2004, he taught undergraduate and graduate courses at the University of Minnesota and at Pennsylvania State University; he also enjoyed ten years of successful public school instrumental music teaching experience in Moore, Oklahoma.

Dr. Teachout’s research interest is in music teacher development. His work has been presented at state, regional, national, and international conferences and published in Journal of Research in Music Education, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Psychology of Music, Arts Education Policy Review, Journal of Music Teacher Education, Journal of Band Research, Contributions in Music Education, Southeastern Journal of Music Education, and in numerous symposium proceedings. Additionally, he is co-author of The Journey from Music Student to Teacher: A Professional Approach, published by Routledge. Dr. Teachout was Co-Principle Investigator for a $374,000 National Science Foundation grant funded to develop interdisciplinary teaching modules for grades 2–5 that explore natural intersections between science and music. Further, Dr. Teachout serves on the editorial review board for Research Issues in Music Education, on the national advisory board for Desert Skies Symposium on Research in Music Education, and served on the national steering committee for Sounds of Learning: The Impact of Music Education, an initiative of the National Association of Music Merchants Foundation that supported research examining the roles of music education in the lives of school-age children. He is past National Chair of the Society for Music Teacher Education (SMTE), and is currently the SMTE Symposium Chair and responsible for hosting the biennial Symposium on Music Teacher Education, which has been held on the UNCG campus since 2005.


Matthew Thibeault

Matthew D. Thibeault
Associate Professor of Cultural and Creative Arts
The Education University of Hong Kong
http://www.matthewthibeault.com

Matthew Thibeault is Associate Professor of Cultural and Creative Arts and Programme Leader of the Master of Arts (Music Education) at the Education University of Hong Kong. Thibeault is the Chair of the NAfME Philosophy SRIG. Thibeault was previously a Faculty Fellow at the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities (2012-13), and was the 2013 recipient of the Outstanding Emerging Researcher Award presented by the Center for Music Education Research at the University of South Florida.

As a researcher, Thibeault regularly publishes in the areas of general music, as well as media and technology (see personal website for publications). Additionally, he a proponent of participatory music education, and has lead and participated in groups that make music for all using the ukulele, USA old-time string bands, and the Okinawan sanshin.

Thibeault studied music education and psychology at Florida State University before completing MA and Ph.D. degrees in Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education (with a concentration in Arts Education) working with Elliot Eisner at Stanford University. He was a full-time public school music specialist (K–3) for the Portola Valley School District, and later worked as an Artist in Residence at the School of the Arts High School in San Francisco as well as for a public laboratory school for Toyama University (Japan). He previously was a faculty member at San José State University, the University of Illinois, and the University of Florida.


Jackie Wiggins

Jackie Wiggins
Distinguished Professor Emerita
Founding Director, School of Music, Theatre and Dance
Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan

Jackie Wiggins is Distinguished Professor Emerita of Music Education and Founding Director of the School of Music, Theatre and Dance at Oakland University. Internationally known for her work in constructivist music education and children’s musical creative process, Wiggins’s professional work includes over 60 publications, more than 200 presentations, and invited keynotes on four continents. She has guest taught at universities throughout the U.S. and abroad and has worked as a research consultant and curricular consultant internationally, nationally, and locally. In 2014, she was named the inaugural recipient of Oakland University’s Outstanding Graduate Mentor Award.

Wiggins’s seminal book, Teaching for Musical Understanding (2001, 2009, 2015), is used by music educators around the world; a Chinese translation will be published in 2019. Recent publications include invited book chapters in The Child as Musician (McPherson, 2015), Approaches to Teaching General Music (Gault & Abril, 2015), and, with Shinko Kondo, Creativity in Music Education (Tsubonou, Tan, & Oie, 2019).

In addition to her work on the BCRME Editorial Committee, Wiggins currently serves on the editorial boards of Research Studies in Music EducationInternational Journal for Education and the ArtsJournal of Creative Music Activity for Children (Japan), and the advisory board of the Asia-Pacific Journal for Arts Education. She has reviewed book manuscripts for Oxford University Press, Springer Publishers, Bloomsbury Publishing, and Indiana University Press. She also serves on the Board of Directors of the Chamber Music Society of Detroit and has been a visiting evaluator for the National Association of Schools of Music.


Paul G. Woodford

Paul G. Woodford
Professor and Acting Chair, Department of Music Education
University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada

Paul Woodford holds degrees from the University of Toronto, the University of Western Ontario, and Northwestern University (Ph.D.) and is professor and former chair of the Department of Music Education at the Don Wright Faculty of Music, the University of Western Ontario. His interests in philosophical, historical, sociological, and political issues affecting the profession have led to many publications, including four books on the history of music in Newfoundland and Labrador, a fifth book, entitled Democracy and Music Education: Liberalism, Ethics, and the Politics of Practice (Indiana University Press, 2005), contributions to The Encyclopedia of Music in Canada (1992), The New Handbook of Research on Music Teaching and Learning (2002), The Oxford Handbook of Music Education (in press), The 111th National Society for the Study of Education Yearbook (in press), and many articles in professional journals. He is past chair of the executive committee of the International Society for the Philosophy of Music Education (2005-7) and is a member of the advisory boards of the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, the British Journal of Music Education, and the Philosophy of Music Education Review.

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